CONCURRENT SESSION 6C SPEAKERS
Approaches to conflict resolution and peace-building


Ian Kelly, Adjunct Senior Lecturer, School of Management, University of South Australia, Adelaide; Coordinator of IIPT International Educators Network

Ian Kelly is a retired Tourism educator with an academic background in Urban Social Geography. He has maintained involvement with teaching and research, and current responsibilities include coordination of the International Institute for Peace through Tourism Educators Network and production of the annual Australian Regional Tourism Handbook.

PRESENTATION TITLE: “Conflict analysis in tourism education”

The paper addresses the existence of industrial, environmental and institutional conflict in tourism; some strategies for analyzing and resolving such conflict; the role of tourism in alleviating conflict; and the central significance of hosting in allocating priorities.

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Hanny Kadijk, Tourism Management, Stenden university

Brigitte Nitsch, Tourism Management, Stenden university

No biography available at this time.

PRESENTATION TITLE: “Home-stay, a haven for peace”

The presentation made the following important conclusions: peace and hospitality are related; true hospitality is found in the personal and collective segments of home-stay hospitality; mutual understanding is to be found in the personal segment of home-stay hospitality; commercial sector determines research agenda; more research on tourist encounters in relation to personal segment needed; and tourism can be a haven for peace.

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Anne Krupp

Omar Moufakkir

No biography available at this time.

PRESENTATION TITLE: “Tour-guiding: an analysis of the Israeli and Palestinian interpretation”

Most touristic situations involve organizations, groups and individuals who are consciously engaged in the task of creating representations of ‘the place’ or ‘the culture.’ Guides’ mediatory significance has often been recognized through reference to them as ‘culture brokers,’ but tourism workers are so much part of the performance of a site that they in a sense ‘become’ it.

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